Commercial Fishing
CATCH AND NO RELEASE STORIES; THE NEW AQUARIUM AND COMMERCIAL FISHING
 

CATCH AND NO RELEASE STORIES; THE NEW AQUARIUM AND COMMERCIAL FISHING

Salamanders, turtles, snakes and river otters as well as 70 species of freshwater fish will be showcased in the new Great Lakes Aquarium at Duluth Harbor, the nation’s only all-freshwater aquarium. Organizers anticipate that 450,000 visitors will generate $5 million annually for the area’s economy. In a special, live, two-hour Minnesota Public Radio broadcast from the Aquarium on Wednesday, August 16, guests will discuss the biggest stars of Duluth’s newest tourist destination—the aquatic wildlife of the world’s largest freshwater lake.

The two-hour event, which is free and open to the public, will be held at the Great Lakes Aquarium in Duluth, Minn. It will be broadcast on 100.5 FM News in Duluth, 92.5 FM News in Virginia, 91.1 FM News in the Twin Cities and across the region on all Minnesota Public Radioâ news and information stations.

During the first hour of the show, from 11:00 a.m. to noon, guests David Lonsdale, Great Lakes Aquarium director and Ann Glumac, Great Lakes Aquarium board chair, will introduce listeners to the new $33.8 million aquarium and its five major habitat exhibits in anticipation of dedication ceremonies scheduled for August 19, 2000.

In the second hour, from noon to 1:00 p.m., Mainstreet Radio host Rachel Reabe will shift the discussion from Lake Superior fish in tanks to Lake Superior fish in nets.

Commercial fishing dominated life on the North Shore for nearly 50 years. From the late l880's to the early l930's, commercial fishing of herring and trout was the main occupation for immigrants from Norway and Sweden who brought their skills from the old country. There were as many as 400 fishermen stretched along Lake Superior's north shore with a fishing station located on average every half-mile from Duluth to the Canadian border. Today some 30 Minnesotans hold commercial fishing licenses on Lake Superior and just a handful are active all season.

Overfishing and sea lamprey eels depleted fish populations, but now officials say the stock of fish is rebounding. Is there a future for commercial fishing in Lake Superior? Join local historian Brian Tofte and fishermen of the North Shore to talk about making a living from the lake.

Also see: Fishing Tackle

Author Notes:

Brian Neeto contributes and publishes news editorial to http://www.chum-bucket.com.  The place to find top quality fishing tackle, lures, reels, rods, gear, supplies & equipment.

 
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